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Owen James
Owen James

Gas Station Simulator.torrent



You can grapple with all sorts of ordeals on a deserted mountain road and make your bread with your sweat, or you can manage a gas station in the city and swim in money in the gas monopoly you set up with your friends.




Gas Station Simulator.torrent



Pumping Simulator As an active member of a gas station in a major city around the world, you can play with up to 10 friends in a multiplayer co-op mode or single player mode to help you understand what the pumpers are going through, and maybe will make you rich.


During the course of Endeavour's 16-day mission, Kelly and his crewmates attached a $2 billion cosmic ray detector to the International Space Station, installed a pallet of spare components, staged four spacewalks to conduct needed maintenance and helped the station crew repair a U.S. oxygen generator and a carbon dioxide scrubber.


The primary goal of the flight is to deliver critical supplies as a hedge against problems that might delay commercial cargo ships being developed to fill in for the shuttle after the fleet is retired. Combined with deliveries by Russian and European cargo ships, Atlantis will carry enough supplies to support the station's six-person crew through 2012.


Atlantis originally was intended to serve as a launch-on-need emergency rescue vehicle in case Endeavour's crew ran into problems that might prevent a safe reentry. But NASA managers ultimately decided to use the agency's final set of boosters and its last external tank to launch one last space station resupply mission.


Sailing 220 miles above Bolivia, the shuttle's docking system disengaged its counterpart on the space station's forward port at 11:55 p.m. EDT (GMT-4) and the orbiter pulled away directly in front of the lab complex.


A few moments later, space station flight engineer Ronald Garan rang the ship's bell in the forward Harmony module and, following naval tradition, announced "Endeavour, departing. Fair winds and following seas, guys."


Following standard practice, pilot Gregory Johnson was at the controls for undocking, guiding the shuttle to a point about 400 feet directly in front of the outpost before kicking off a slow 360-degree photo-survey fly around, looping up above, behind, below and back out in front of the laboratory at a distance of about 600 feet. A small rocket firing then put Endeavour on a trajectory carrying it back above and behind the station.


"It's the first time we'll be doing a re-rendezvous with space station, and it's a different kind of rendezvous," Kelly said in a pre-launch NASA interview. "The plan is after we undock, we'll go out to about 400 feet, we'll do a fly-around like we normally do, and then when we come up back in front of the space station again, we're then going to do this series of burns where we're going to fall behind.


"Then we're going to come back in doing a profile that's actually quite similar to what Apollo used for a rendezvous. Instead of coming up on the R-bar, which is right underneath the space station, or the V-bar, which is the direction it's going, we're going to come up on a 45-degree angle from behind. The sensor (is a) more advanced laser system, cameras, that can give some very accurate range and range-rate data. ... So we're going to test that as we come up to the space station."


Known by an acronym that's a stretch by even NASA standards -- the Sensor Test for Orion Relative Navigation Risk Mitigation -- the STORRM sensor package is mounted in the shuttle's cargo bay. It includes a high-definition camera and a laser that flashes on and off 30 times a second to "illuminate" targets mounted on the space station.


The STORRM equipment was operated by astronaut Andrew Feustel during Endeavour's approach to the station May 18 and engineers said it worked well. Since then, the recorder used to store data from the high definition docking camera failed and the system did not boot up for the post-undocking rendezvous test.


"We did the fly-around, got our standard photos of the entire outside of the space station," he said. "Once the fly-around was complete, the crew started the STORRM trajectory. All those burns went perfectly, the trajectory was right on the money and everything just went really, really well."


Coming back toward the space station, "we targeted 1,000 feet below and 300 feet behind," Horlacher said. "We got to about 950 feet from the space station and the trajectory stalled out, the crew did not have to do any braking pulses whatsoever and we just fell away. So again, the trajectory was right on the money."


Horlacher said before launch that STORRM represented "an outstanding way to take advantage of the spaceflight capabilities we have today with the shuttle and the space station to demonstrate new technologies that will be used for future spacecraft."


Following standard practice, Endeavour pilot Gregory Johnson was at the controls for undocking, guiding the shuttle to a point about 400 feet directly in front of the outpost before kicking off a slow 360-degree photo-survey fly around, looping up above, behind, below and back out in front of the laboratory at a distance of about 600 feet. A small rocket firing was planned to put Endeavour on a trajectory carrying it back above and behind the station.


"It's the first time we'll be doing a re-rendezvous with space station, and it's a different kind of rendezvous," Kelly said in a NASA interview. "The plan is after we undock, we'll go out to about 400 feet, we'll do a fly-around like we normally do, and then when we come up back in front of the space station again, we're then going to do this series of burns where we're going to fall behind.


Known by an acronym that's a stretch by even NASA standards -- the Sensor Test for Orion Relative Navigation Risk Mitigation -- the STORRM sensor package is mounted in the shuttle's cargo bay. It includes a high-definition camera and a laser that will flash on and off 30 times a second to "illuminate" targets mounted on the space station.


The STORRM equipment was astronaut Andrew Feustel during Endeavour's approach to the station May 18 and engineers said it worked well. Since then, the recorder used to store data from the high definition docking camera failed and the camera is not expected to be available for the post-undocking rendezvous test.


As for the post-undocking test, "whatever we get will be sufficient," she said. "The re-rendezvous was designed to meet the (laser scan) objectives. So we have our primary objective coming up at that long range on that re-rendezvous trajectory. ... We were fortunate that we got as much as we did (during Endeavour's approach to the station). We feel we'll have been able to assess enough to feel that camera will be a good camera to use for Orion."


Shuttle Flight Director Gary Horlacher said the STORRM laser system "will be taking data all the way out until the sensors drop lock outside 20,000 feet. Then we'll go ahead and do an orbit lowering burn, which is going to bring us down below the space station and get us set up for the trajectory to mimic the Orion approach to the space station."


That trajectory is "designed to have us stall out about 1,000 feet below and 300 feet behind the space station," Horlacher said. "And then orbital mechanics will pull us down and away. STORRM sensors will continue to take data until the sensors drop lock. And when we get outside that range, we'll go ahead and call the docked mission complete and then we'll get our nominal water dumps accomplished and get the ship prepared to come back home."


Horlacher said STORRM represents "an outstanding way to take advantage of the spaceflight capabilities we have today with the shuttle and the space station to demonstrate new technologies that will be used for future spacecraft."


Commander Mark Kelly and his five crewmates -- pilot Gregory H. Johnson, Michael Fincke, Gregory Chamitoff, Andrew Feustel and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori -- went to bed shortly before 11:30 a.m. EDT (GMT-4) Sunday after bidding the station's three-man crew farewell. The astronauts were awakened at 7:26 p.m. with a recording of "Slowness" by the Tucson band Calexico, beamed up for Kelly and his wife, Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.


Following standard practice, Johnson will guide the shuttle to a point about 400 feet directly in front of the outpost before kicking off a slow 360-degree photo-survey fly around, looping up above, behind, below and back out in front of the laboratory at a distance of about 600 feet. A small rocket firing then will put Endeavour on a trajectory carrying it back above and behind the station. 041b061a72


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